beetroot ravioli with sage & brown butter

beetroot ravioli with sage & brown butter | table twenty eight

:: After what feels like an impossibly hectic blur of a year, I’m now on leave for two glorious weeks.

Work has been all-consuming of late, as we’re mobilising a huge piece of kit from the other side of the globe within a very tight time frame.  While it’s been a great experience to be part of such a massive logistical challenge, it’s meant long hours in the office with little time or energy for anything else.

Domestic life became rather haphazard as a result – laundry overflowed and threatened to instigate a mutiny; grocery shopping was an entirely forgotten exercise (dinner being relegated in priority after HOT SHOWER and BED); and after one particularly intense day, I was so distracted I found myself trying to open my front door with my security pass…

The timely delivery of a menu flyer from the new pizza joint around the corner meant I got to know their driver rather well (the number of times I called there for takeaway was getting embarrassing).

And on top of my own neglectful dietary habits I kept forgetting to buy cat food, so fur child was living on rations of whatever I could find in the fridge – chorizo, smoked edam, canned tuna with ginger and soy – and one night I even cooked him an omelette.

Ironically, in the face of these more than usual gourmet offerings, I was treated to questioning meows wanting to know where the real cat food was hiding and blatant rejection of aforementioned dishes (I’m sure parents of fussy children everywhere can relate to such rebuffs).

bailey | table twenty eightbailey | table twenty eight

But I finally made it to freedom, oh sweet freedom!

Being able to move at my own pace…  Taking time for a cup of tea in the morning… Sitting in the sunshine with Bailey and reading a book… Listening to Pink Floyd whilst cataloging photos from my holiday from last year…

These are the small pleasures I’ve been able to embrace.

And of course it also means I can get back into the kitchen at long last.

I’ve had this dish bookmarked for a time when I could set aside a few leisurely hours for pasta-making.

The salty, caramalised butter works wonderfully with the earthy beetroot and herbaceous, fragrant sage – and it’s also a visually lovely dish with those distinctive little magenta pillows.

beetroot ravioli with sage & brown butter | table twenty eight

beetroot ravioli with
sage & brown butter

adapted from the july 2014 issue of delicious. magazine


8 small cooked beetroots, peeled and cooled

2 large pontiac or desiree potatoes, peeled and quartered
1 cup smooth ricotta
1 garlic clove, chopped
½ cup grated parmesan, plus extra to serve
125g unsalted butter
20 fresh sage leaves
white pepper
sea salt

pasta dough (jamie oliver’s recipe here)
500g plain flour

5 eggs


Start by preparing the pasta dough, so it can rest while you make the filling.

Place the flour on a clean, dry surface or in a large bowl, and make a well in the centre.

Crack the eggs into the well and beat with a fork until smooth.

Using the tips of your fingers, mix the eggs with the surrounding flour, incorporating a little at a time until everything is combined.

Alternatively, you can make your dough in a food processor if you have one.  Whiz the two ingredients together until the flour looks like breadcrumbs, then tip the mixture on to a work surface and bring the dough together into one lump using your hands.

Once you’ve made the dough, it’s time to knead and work it with your hands to develop the gluten in the flour.

When the pasta starts to feel smooth and silky instead of rough and floury, it’s done.

Wrap the single piece of dough in cling film and place in the fridge to rest for at least half an hour before you use it.

beetroots | table twenty eight

For the ravioli filling, start by puréeing the beetroots and garlic in a food processor.

Cook the potato in a saucepan of boiling salted water for about 10 minutes until tender.  Drain, mash and cool slightly.

Combine the beetroot purée, mashed potato, ricotta and parmesan, mixing thoroughly with a fork until you can no longer see traces of white ricotta.  Season well with white pepper and sea salt, and set aside while you roll out your pasta dough.

Divide the dough into four pieces.  Set your pasta machine to its widest setting and roll a lump of pasta dough through it, lightly dusting the pasta with flour if it starts to stick.

Run a piece of dough through a few times, folding in half each time until you reach a smooth, even consistency.

Keep rolling the dough through all the settings on the machine, from the widest down to the thinnest, lightly dusting the pasta with a little flour every time you run it through.

You should end up with four long, thin sheets of pasta.

Fresh pasta dries out very quickly, so don’t leave it for more than a minute or two before cutting or shaping it.  Lay a damp tea towel over the top to help stop it from drying out.

beetroot ravioli with sage & brown butter | table twenty eight

Cut the sheets into 10cm squares and place one teaspoon of filling in the centre of half of the squares.

Lightly brush the edges around the filling with a tiny amount of water and place another square over top.

Press down the edges to seal the ravioli and make sure that any air is pushed out as you go.

Neaten and trim the edges as required and then transfer to a tray generously dusted with plain flour.  Set aside for 15 minutes to dry out a little.

Melt the butter in a frypan over medium heat.

Add the sage leaves until the butter is brown and the sage leaves are crisp.

Cook the ravioli in batches, in a large pot of boiling salted water until they float to the surface.

Remove with a slotted spoon, distribute between serving plates and drizzle the brown butter over the top.  Serve with extra parmesan.

beetroot ravioli with sage & brown butter | table twenty eight


red wine poached pears with lime mousse

red wine poached pears with lime mousse | table twenty eight

:: When I was young, one of my favourite desserts was my grandmother’s poached pears.

She would poach the pears until only just cooked through – al dente – with reams of whole lemon peel and a modest splash of red wine that turned the poaching liquid a lovely rose colour.

I remember they were delicious by themselves but Grandmama often served them with a dollop of thick greek yogurt and the rosé-hued syrup spooned over the top.

red wine poached pears with lime mousse | table twenty eight

This recipe is sort of the grown-up version, with a rich, velvety syrup reminiscent of mulled wine and fruit destined for far greater things than being spooned over one’s morning muesli.

The lime mousse is a wonderful culinary discovery that I’ll be keeping on file for future desserts. The infusion of citrus makes a nice alternative to regular whipped cream and provides a lovely lift to the sumptuous, spiced pears.

red wine poached pears with lime mousse | table twenty eight

red wine poached pears
with lime mousse

from the december 2011 issue of delicious. magazine


6 firm pears (such as packham or corella)

2 cups red wine
400g caster sugar
1 vanilla bean, split and seeds scraped
1 cinnamon quill
2 star anise
½ cup toasted hazelnuts, roughly chopped

lime mousse
2 titanium-strength gelatine leaves
150ml lime juice (from about 4 limes)
125g castor sugar
300ml thickened cream, whipped to soft peaks

 

Peel and core the pears and then cut into quarters.

Place the pear quarters, red wine, caster sugar, vanilla pod and seeds, spices and two cups of water in a large saucepan.

Bring to the boil over medium heat, stirring gently to dissolve the sugar.

Cover the surface closely with a piece of baking paper cut to fit and reduce the heat to medium-low.

Simmer for about 45 minutes, or until the pears are soft. Remove from the heat and allow the pears to cool in the poaching liquid.

red wine poached pears with lime mousse | table twenty eight

Meanwhile, for the lime mousse, soak the gelatine leaves in cold water for five minutes.

Combine the lime juice, sugar and one cup of water in a pan over medium heat, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Remove from the heat.

Squeeze the excess water from gelatine and stir into the warm lime syrup until completely dissolved.

Pour the liquid through a fine sieve to remove any small solids and refrigerate for about 40 minutes. Once cool, fold the whipped cream into the lime syrup in three batches.

To serve, remove the pears from the poaching liquid.

Arrange two pears in the base of each serving glass and divide half the mousse between the glasses.

Repeat the layers and scatter the toasted hazelnuts over the top.


denmark | winter twenty-fourteen

::  Last month, Mr Pitt and I escaped the city to spend a long weekend in one of my favourite holiday spots.

I’ve previously shared photos and anecdotes from my getaways to Denmark, which is nestled in an idyllic location between the coast, karri forest and vineyards at the bottom of Western Australia.

A trip down to Denmark is inevitably means indulging in the fantastic local produce on offer in the area – wines, cider and ports from the many vineyards; bounties of cheese from many dairy producers; and fresh-from-the-farm fruit and vegies.

One of the prerequisites for choosing our accommodation was a log-fire to curl up in front during the cool winter nights and after careful consideration of several options, we chose a lovely, cosy chalet about 10 minutes from the town centre with a fantastic view of Denmark’s valleys and coast beyond.

Our little patch of holiday bliss also ended up being next door to the renowned restaurant where I’d booked lunch on our second day.

Forest Hill Winery is home to Pepper and Salt Restaurant, the superb establishment run by Chef Silas Masih and his wife Angela.  The menu is a fusion of locally sourced produce combined with Silas’ love of spices and his Fijian-Indian heritage. It is quite honestly one of the most memorable fine-dining experiences I’ve ever had – and I’ve eaten a lot in my time.

Pair that with a stunning view and you’ve got a match made in heaven.  Next year my best friends S and V are getting married at Forest Hill, with the reception at Pepper and Salt – which is why I was so eager to visit and see what was in store for us.  Needless to say, I have no doubt it will be a truly wonderful and unforgettable event…

 

a denmark tradition | breakfast at the bibbulmun café

fruit & nut breakfast bread, bibbulmun cafe, denmark WA | table twenty eight

bacon & egg sandwich, bibbulmun cafe, denmark WA | table twenty eight

 
our accommodation | karma chalets

karma chalets, denmark WA | table twenty eight

 
views of singlefile winery

singlefile winery, denmark WA | table twenty eightsinglefile winery, denmark WA | table twenty eight

singlefile winery, denmark WA | table twenty eightsinglefile winery, denmark WA | table twenty eight

 
driving on denmark’s rally-worthy roads

country road, denmark WA | table twenty eight


views of rickety gate winery

rickety gate vineyard, denmark WA | table twenty eight

rickety gate vineyard, denmark WA | table twenty eight

rickety gate vineyard, denmark WA | table twenty eight


pepper & salt restaurant | the view of karma chalets from the restaurant balcony

karma chalets, denmark WA | table twenty eight

 
views of forest hill winery

denmark weekend, june 022forest fungi, denmark WA | table twenty eight

forest hill winery, denmark WA | table twenty eight

forest hill winery, denmark WA | table twenty eight

forest hill winery, denmark WA | table twenty eight


pepper & salt restaurant | soft shell crab with lemon myrtle salt & ginger tamarind sauce

soft shell crab with lemon myrtle salt & ginger tamarind sauce at pepper & salt restaurant, denmark WA | table twenty eight

 
pepper & salt restaurant | plantagenet beef eye-fillet with beetroot chutney & sticky pan jus

plantagenet beef eye-fillet with beetroot chutney & sticky pan jus at pepper & salt restaurant, denmark WA | table twenty eight


pepper & salt restaurant | poached quince, rhubarb & bircher muesli crumble with chilli orange ice cream

poached quince, rhubarb & bircher muesli crumble with chilli orange ice cream at pepper & salt restaurant, denmark WA | table twenty eight


pepper & salt restaurant | kaffir lime & cardamom arancini with passionfruit curd & lychee sorbet

kaffir lime & cardamom arancini with passionfruit curd & lychee sorbet at pepper & salt restaurant, denmark WA | table twenty eight

 


jerusalem artichoke soup with olive oil crackers

jerusalem artichokes with olive oil crackers | table twenty eigh

:: My favourite vegetable is unfortunately only available for a couple of months of the year.

Most people have never heard of them before and it doesn’t help that they have a rather misleading name.

Jerusalem artichokes aren’t actually related to globe artichokes and really – from an appearance point of view – that fact is rather obvious (it’s like saying kittens and ponies are related because they’re both cute and have four legs).

Apparently the misnomer is due to a bungled historic translation of Italian and with their knobbly, tuber-like exterior you’d even be forgiven for thinking they’re related to ginger.

jeruselum artichoke soup with olive oil crackers | table twenty eight

They have a rich, nutty and garlicky flavor, with a texture similar to potatoes.

And like potatoes, they’re wonderful roasted in the oven with garlic cloves and sage, or simply steamed and served with butter.

But to my great disappointment, Jerusalem artichokes are only available for a couple of months during the winter period and consequently, I tend each as much as I can get my hands on.

This is the first time I’ve made soup with them and the flavour that develops from the medley of sweet caramelised leeks, garlic and artichokes is divine.

The olive oil crackers are worth giving a shot too – they’re so easy to make and provide a crunchy, textural element to the silky soup.  Just make sure to roll them out wafer-thin so that they can crisp up nicely in the oven.

olive oil crackers | table twenty eight

jerusalem artichoke soup
with olive oil crackers

adapted from katie quinn davies‘ recipe, august 2013 issue of delicious. magazine


50g butter

2 leeks, washed and trimmed, white parts reserved and sliced
1 onion, chopped
2 celery stalks, chopped
4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1.2kg jeruselum artichokes, peeled and roughly chopped
small handful flat-leaf parsley, chopped
(plus extra for serving)
2L (8 cups) vegetable stock
½ cup thickened cream
50g goat’s curd
lemon-infused olive oil, for drizzling

olive oil crackers
1 ⅓ cups plain flour
⅓ cups wholemeal spelt flour
½ cup warm water
pinch of salt
1 tsp baking powder
3 tbsp olive oil (plus extra for brushing)
2 tsp cumin seeds
2 tsp fennel seeds

 

For the olive oil crackers, combine the flours, baking powder and salt in a large bowl.

Add the olive oil and water. Stir to combine, bringing together the wet and dry ingredients with one hand.

Knead lightly to form a smooth dough, pat into a disk and cover in cling wrap. Refrigerate, allowing the dough to rest for approximately one hour.

Meanwhile, combine the cumin and fennel seeds in a bowl and set aside.

Preheat your oven to 220°C.

Divide the dough into two pieces and roll out each piece on a floured surface to 2mm thick.

Cut the dough into rough squares or triangles and transfer to tray lined with baking paper.

Brush the pieces with olive oil, scatter with the mixed seeds and season to taste.

Bake in batches until the crackers are golden and crisp, about 6 – 7 minutes.

Once cooked, transfer them to a wire rack to cool.

jerusalem artichokes with olive oil crackers | table twenty eigh

For the soup, melt the butter in a large saucepan over low heat and add the onion, celery and garlic.

Cook, stirring frequently, for 10 – 15 minutes until softened.

Add the artichokes, parsley and vegetable stock. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat to medium and cook for 20 minutes until tender.

Remove from the heat and cool before transferring to a blender. Blitz in batches until you have a smooth purée.

Return the soup to a large saucepan over medium heat. Season to taste and warm through.

Just before serving, remove from the heat and stir through the cream.

Divide the soup among serving bowls, top with dollops of goat’s curd, chopped parsley and drizzle with olive oil.

Serve with the olive oil crackers.


flourless tangelo & almond cake

flourless tangelo & almond cake | table twenty eight

::  Over the weekend I had the sudden urge to drop everything and bake.

It was a craving for the methodical mixing of butter, sugar and eggs; the creation of something tangible to sit in warm, syrupy glory on the bench top and waft sweet aromas throughout the apartment.

In times of change or mounting tasks that seem discouragingly far from completion (several loads of laundry requiring washing, drying, ironing and folding; re-potting houseplants who’ve outgrown their homes; getting another set of keys cut; mentally planning the working week ahead; scrubbing the shower; calling my grandmother to ease my guilt of not speaking to her for weeks; arranging an overseas holiday to match the air tickets I purchased months ago)….

…Well, when all this chaos is bouncing at high speed around one’s brain, being able to follow a clear set of instructions and turn out a tiny, hopeful result in the midst of disorder is quite cheering.

Even for an experimental, non-follower-of-instructions cook like me.

flourless tangelo & almond cake | table twenty eight

I’d received some wonderfully vibrant tangelos from my good friend M, whose mother owns the beautifully tendered garden that I’ve shared previously (here).

Their tangelo tree is currently laden with fruit, adding a glorious pop of colour to surroundings which are otherwise subdued in the midst of their winter hues.

flourless tangelo & almond cake | table twenty eight

After my first successful round of baking (a banana, date and walnut cake which I’m sure will feature here one day), I was feeling more consoled but still in need of the therapeutic benefits of baking.

Inspired by the vivid tangelos sitting on the kitchen table, I used them as a substitute in the classic combination of almond meal and orange.

Tangelos provide a very similar flavour but have a nice, restrained ‘tang’ that distinguishes them from their orange cousins – ideal for balancing sweetness.

The almond meal retains the moisture of the fruit juice, resulting in an almost pudding-like cake. 

You can serve it warm, straight from the oven, with a scoop of vanilla ice cream or mascarpone – or let it cool and save slices for a rainy day, when in need of some sunshine and satisfying cheer.

flourless tangelo & almond cake | table twenty eight

flourless tangelo & almond cake


120g butter

3 cups almond meal
juice of 2 tangelos
juice of 1 lemon
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 vanilla pod, seeds scraped
4 eggs
1 cup castor sugar
¼ cup plain yogurt
1 tsp bicarbonate of soda

tangelo syrup
juice of 1 tangelo
¼ cup castor sugar


Preheat your oven to 180°C and line a loaf pan with greaseproof paper.

Place the butter and sugar in the bowl of an electric mixer. Beat on high until creamy and light.

Reduce the mixer speed to slow and carefully add the eggs, one at a time, beating after each addition until the mixture is fully incorporated.

 Dissolve the bicarbonate of soda in the plain yogurt and add to the butter mixture, along with the citrus juices, vanilla extract and scraped vanilla seeds.

Beat on a slow speed to ensure all ingredients are combined.

Finally, using a spatula, gently fold through the almond meal so that you end up with an even, wet batter.

Pour into the prepared loaf pan and bake for 45 minutes, or until a cake skewer comes out clean.

flourless tangelo & almond cake | table twenty eight

Set aside to cool whilst preparing the tangelo syrup.

Place the citrus juice and sugar in a saucepan over medium heat and cook, stirring frequently, until the mixture starts to bubble.

Turn the heat to low and simmer for 15 minutes, until the syrup has reduced and become viscous.

Pour the syrup over the cake whilst still warm and allow it to soak into the cake before slicing.


slow-braised beef cheeks with salsa verde

slow-braised beef cheeks with salsa verde | table twenty eight

:: If pesto is a indulgent, luxurious Roman aristocrat then salsa verde is its vibrant Mediterranean coastal cousin.

With its punchy, acidic flavours of lemon, capers and herbs, it pairs wonderfully with any type of seafood.

But one union I hadn’t previously considered was using it to give some lighter, fresher notes to hearty winter dishes.

slow-braised beef cheeks with salsa verde | table twenty eight

Slow-cooked casseroles are wonderful in their own right, served with mash potato or pasta or hunks of crusty bread for the ultimate satisfying tummy-filler.

But I highly suggest giving tradition an interesting new twist with a few dollops of this vibrant sauce.

This was the first time I’ve cooked beef cheeks and to be honest, they really aren’t the most attractive cuts of meat. I was rather taken aback at their appearance and how determinedly tough they were to trim.

But pour over some velvety cabernet merlot and leave them for a few hours in the oven – well, let’s just say that magic happens

slow-braised beef cheeks with salsa verde 006

slow-braised beef cheeks
with salsa verde

adapted from ‘delicious. more please’ by valli little


750ml bottle of red wine

6 beef cheeks, trimmed
2 onions, chopped
4 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
1L good quality beef stock
2 bay leaves
2 tbsp plain flour, seasoned with salt and pepper
olive oil

salsa verde
1 thick slice of white bread, crusts removed
½ cup olive oil
1 handful flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped
1 handful basil, finely chopped
2 tbsp finely chopped lemon zest
¼ cup lemon juice
2 tbsp capers, drained and chopped
2 cloves garlic, crushed

to serve
creamy mash potato or wet polenta


Preheat your oven to 170°C.

Place the wine in a medium saucepan and simmer over medium heat for about 10 minutes or until reduced by half.

Heat a glug of olive oil in a large ovenproof casserole dish over medium-high heat.

Dust the beef cheeks in the seasoned flour. The easiest way to do this is to place the flour in a plastic bag (first make sure there are no holes in the bottom!), pop in the beef cheeks and give the whole thing a good shake to make sure the meat is evenly coated.

In batches, brown the beef cheeks for a couple of minutes each side on each side until sealed, adding a little more oil in between if necessary. Remove and set aside.

Add the onions to the pan, reduce the heat to medium and cook for 5 minutes, stirring, until soft.

Stir in the garlic and return the browned beef cheeks to the pan.

Add the reduced wine, beef stock and bay leaves. The meat should be completely covered with liquid, so top up with water if necessary.

Cover and cook in the oven for at least two and half hours or until the beef is meltingly tender.

Meanwhile for the salsa verde, break the bread into chunks and drizzle with olive oil.

Mix with your hands so that the oil is absorbed and then place with the remaining olive oil and sauce ingredients in a blender or food processor.

Blend to a paste and taste to check the flavour balance. If the sauce is too thick, you can thin it with more lemon juice and olive oil.

Set aside until ready to serve.

Once the meat is cooked and completely tender, carefully remove the cheeks and place on a plate, covering with foil to keep them warm.

Place the casserole over medium-high heat and simmer for about 10 minutes until the sauce thickens. Taste and season if necessary.

Serve the beef cheeks over a bed of mashed potato, ladle generously with the cooking sauce and dollop with salsa verde.


making gnocchi at c restaurant

making c restaurant's gnocchi | table twenty eight

:: Two weeks ago, I was very privileged to be asked into the kitchen of C Restaurant to observe the making of what is arguably their famous dish – gnocchi with napolitana sauce, gorgonzola and spinach cream.

C Restaurant is located on the top floor of St Martin’s Tower in Perth’s CBD and is the city’s singular revolving restaurant, offering a 360° panorama of Perth and the Swan River.

Although challenged to keep up with the dramatic transformation of the city’s dining scene during the past couple of years and compete with the vast number of new bars and eateries popping up, C Restaurant remains a polished venue offering some of the best value fine dining in Perth.

c restaurant, st martin's tower in perth | table twenty eight

Long time followers may remember my efforts to replicate C’s signature dish a couple of years ago; a homage to its gnocchi which is served atop a bed of rich tomato sugo, covered in gorgonzola and spinach cream and a sprinkling of parmesan, then broiled under the grill until golden brown and molten.  Absolutely delicious…

So when Head Chef, Frantisek (Fero) Ilizi, invited me into the restaurant’s kitchen to watch the creation of such a favourite, I was most appreciative and eager to take him up on the offer.

A huge thank you to Fero and the C Restaurant team for such a unique opportunity to see what goes on behind the scenes of a commercial kitchen.

making c restaurant's gnocchi | table twenty eight

To make the several kilos of gnocchi required each day, a mountain of potatoes are boiled, peeled whilst still warm and then passed through a moulie.

The finely mashed potato is turned out on a large surface and seasoned with nutmeg, white pepper and parmesan, before the binding agents of flour and egg yolks are added.

making c restaurant's gnocchi | table twenty eight

making c restaurant's gnocchi | table twenty eight

making c restaurant's gnocchi | table twenty eight

The dough is brought together with care.  Fero’s key tip here is to do so very gently and avoiding over-kneading the mixture, in order for the consistency remain as light as possible.

The dough is then divided and rolled into logs, before being chopped into the distinctive diamond-shaped gnocchi.

making c restaurant's gnocchi | table twenty eight

making c restaurant's gnocchi | table twenty eight

making c restaurant's gnocchi | table twenty eight

The trays of gnocchi are tipped into vats of boiling, salted water and cooked until the individual pieces float to the surface.

Once removed and drained, they are sautéed in a hot pan until glossy and caramelised at the edges.

making c restaurant's gnocchi | table twenty eight

making c restaurant's gnocchi | table twenty eight

Cream and gorgonzola are added to the pan and heated through until foaming, before adding handfuls of fresh spinach.

When ready to serve, a layer of thick napolitana sauce is ladled into the base of a shallow bowl, gnocchi placed on top and the gorgonzola cream poured over.

After a final sprinkling of parmesan, the bowl is placed under a hot grill to develop a lovely cheesy crust and the final touch is a garnish of sundried tomatoes.

making c restaurant's gnocchi | table twenty eight


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 365 other followers

%d bloggers like this: